Frequently Asked Questions

Clients

What should I do when the Applicant Verification results show the number is invalid?

If the Applicant Verification results show that the Social Security number provided by the applicant is invalid, please first contact One Source to verify that the Social Security number was entered correctly when the order was placed.

If the Social Security number was entered correctly and still shows as invalid, please check with your applicant to make sure the correct Social Security number was provided to you.

If an applicant has a Social Security card that is stamped “VALID FOR WORK ONLY WITH DHS AUTHORIZATION” or “VALID FOR WORK ONLY WITH INS AUTHORIZATION”, you will need to contact the Social Security Administration, as our system is unable to recognize and process these Social Security numbers. One last possibility is that the applicant has actually provided you with an invalid Social Security number. Please contact a One Source Client Relations Representative about using the E-Verify system if you would like to confirm Social Security Numbers.

How do I read a credit report?

Click here to download the TransUnion Credit Report Guide.

How do I request a background check order from One Source?

If you need assistance entering an order into the One Source Online System please contact One Source at (402) 933-9999 or (800) 608-3645 and ask to speak to a member of the Client Relations Team.

What is a site inspection?

Any company requesting consumer reports must prove the legitimacy of the business and the security procedures for storing consumer reports. Any company not undergoing a site inspection will be denied access to consumer reports.
*One Source will accept accreditation certification for a business instead of a site inspection. A business that has gone through certain requirements of accreditation must show proof of accreditation for exemption of the required on-site inspection. Those businesses eligible for this exemption are schools, members of the banking Industry and health care facilities. Proven documentation must be provided at the time of application for approval at One Source’s judgment. All clients pulling Trans Union Credit Reports will be required to have a site inspection per Trans Union. For more information on Site Inspections click here.

How do I correct a data entry or service selection error after I have already submitted the order to One Source?

Contact One Source at (402) 933-9999 or (800) 608-3645 and ask to speak to a member of the Operations Team.

What is the turn around time for my order?

The average turnaround time for a report is 24 to 48 hours depending on the searches that you have ordered. If you need to know how long a particular applicant is going to take please contact a member of the Operations Team at (402) 933-9999 or (800) 608-3645.

Do applicants need to sign a release form before I can conduct a background check?

In order to stay compliant with the Fair Credit Reporting Act and your One Source Client Service Agreement you must obtain a release from the applicant before ordering your background check. If you have any questions about which release form to use or how to request multiple services on an employee please contact the One Source Client Relations Team.

Can I provide applicants a copy of their background check report?

Yes.

Where can I get a copy of the background check release form?

Click here to download the release form.

What information is used to verify criminal case information?

A full name (first, middle, and last name) and a full date of birth are most commonly used in verifying criminal information. A social security number, address, and a driver’s license can also be used depending on what information needs to be further verified. Please input as much information as possible. This will provide you a better and more accurate criminal background check.

Why does the background check report include dismissed charges?

Arrests or tickets which have become dismissed charges can be reported for seven years from the date they were filed in accordance with the Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act. This information would be considered “Negative Information” about a consumer and can be reported for seven years from the file date. One Source does allow for our clients to choose whether or not they want dismissed information. If you are receiving dismissed charges on your report and you want them to stop, please notify one of our customer relations specialists and they will make the changes to your account. If you would like dismissed information and are not currently receiving it, they can also help to add them to your account.

Why does One Source report case information older than seven years?

One Source searches as far back as each county will let us search (each county makes their own search criteria) in an effort to provide the most complete report available. The Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act does not limit the time frame for listing criminal convictions. Therefore criminal convictions may be reported indefinitely. The most important reason for our search beyond seven years is to look for cases where the individual has been in jail or prison for an extended period of time (10, 15, 20 years) and was recently released. If we only searched for convictions in the previous seven years, pertinent charges such as murder, rape and other felony charges about your applicant may not appear. Exceptions may apply when an applicant and/or employer are located in a state that has specific guidelines. In such situations, One Source will report case information as applicable.

Clients can request a limit on the number of years reported to show only the last 7 or 10 years of criminal information. For these accounts, One Source will list criminal history for 7 (or 10) years from the final date of disposition. How does this apply? The information is reportable 7 (or 10) years from the disposition date plus any time required for the disposition. For example an applicant has a disposition of 2 years probation, the case would be listed for 9 years from the disposition date. Please contact Client Relations for more information on limiting the amount of criminal history received.

What does it mean when the Adult / Child Abuse Registry search is Incomplete?

The Adult/Child Abuse Registry is marked as Incomplete, with the comment: “The other check is PENDING a complete review of archived Other records” while the abuse requests are in process. One Source does this so the client can see that the abuse request has been ordered and is in process. This also allows One Source to deliver the remainder of your order without causing any additional delays.

Where can I get a copy of the Nebraska and/or Iowa Adult/Child Abuse forms?

Who do I contact if I have a question about the results of the background check report?

Please contact a our Team by calling (800) 608-3645 and we will be happy to answer any questions.

Is there a way to search and view background reports using my online account?

Click here to download detailed instructions on how to view background reports.

How do I receive the results of my background check order?

An HTML embedded web-link will be emailed to you when your report is completed. That link is password protected. Or you can search for your applicant under the applicant tab by social security number or last name.

What does it mean when the Adult/Child Abuse Registry search is marked as “See Comments”?

  1. The Adult/Child Abuse Registry is marked as See Comments, “This search requires state specific signed release form.” with any of the following comments:» “Please fax completed IOWA AUTHORIZATION FOR RELEASE OF CHILD ABUSE INFORMATION form to One Source at 402.333.3280 or 1.800.929.8117.”» “Please fax completed IOWA REQUEST FOR DEPENDENT ADULT ABUSE REGISTRY INFORMATION form to One Source at 402.333.3280 or 1.800.929.8117.”» “Please fax completed NEBRASKA HHS RELEASE OF INFORMATION form to One Source at 402.333.3280 or 1.800.929.8117.”This means that the appropriate state specific abuse release form was not received by One Source. If you receive a report containing this message, simply fax the appropriate abuse release form to One Source at 402.333.3280 or 1.800.929.8117. Once the form has been received, the report will be updated to reflect as such.
  2. The Nebraska Child Abuse Registry is marked as See Comments with the following comments: “This search requires state specific signed release form.”*PLEASE HAVE APPLICANT COMPLETE THE NEW VERSION OF THE NEBRASKA ABUSE REGISTRY RELEASE FORM.*This means that an outdated version of the Nebraska Abuse release form was submitted to One Source. The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services went to one standardized version of the Nebraska Abuse release form. They will no longer accept any version of the Nebraska Abuse release form that differs from the newest version of the form which can be found under Forms and Links.If you receive a report containing this message, please have your applicant complete the new version of the Nebraska Abuse release form
  3. The Adult/Child Abuse Registry is marked as See Comments with the comment “Record of abuse found.” This means that the Department of Health and Human Services has found a record of abuse matching the name and information provided by your applicant. One Source is only notified if there is a record of abuse found, or if there is no record of abuse found. One Source and the client do not receive any specific details regarding the record of abuse. For more information regarding the record of abuse, please contact your applicant.

How can an applicant request a correction of a Child Abuse report?

For requests for correction of a CHILD abuse report, your applicant will need to do the following:

In Iowa: Please submit a request in writing to: Central Abuse Registry, Attn: Registry Review, 5th Fl, 1305 E Walnut St, Des Moines, IA 50319-0114. Your applicant will be notified in writing of the Registry decision whether to grant review of a report. If your applicant disagrees with this decision, the written notice will explain how they may request an administrative hearing about the report and its conclusions. (Iowa Code Section 235A.19)

In Nebraska: Please contact the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services at 402-471-1078 for further assistance.

Other States: Please contact One Source at (800) 608-3645 for instructions.

How can an applicant request a correction of an Adult Abuse report?

For requests for correction of an ADULT abuse report, your applicant will need to do the following:
In Iowa: Please contact the Iowa Department of Health and Human Services at 515.281.5581 for further assistance.
In Nebraska: Please contact the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services at 402.471.9190 for further assistance.

What is a No User Pass?

No User Pass is now Applicant Entry Link. If your business will be ordering multiple background reports due to a constant candidate pool, One Source can set you up with a custom link for ordering background checks. You can then share this link with your candidates who can order their background checks on their own time. These orders are processed through your client account just as though your company entered them individually. Those with access to your account can see the orders and processed reports.

Applicants

How do I request a copy of my background report?

Click here to submit a request online.

What information is used to verify criminal case information?

A full name (first, middle, and last name) and a full date of birth are most commonly used in verifying criminal information. A social security number, address, and a driver’s license can also be used depending on what information needs to be further verified.

How do I dispute the accuracy of my background check report?

Click here to learn more about disputing your report.

Why does my background report include case information that is older than seven years ago?

The Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act does not limit the time frame for listing criminal convictions. Therefore criminal convictions can be reported indefinitely.

Why does my report include dismissed charges?

Arrests or tickets which have become dismissed charges can be reported for seven years from the date they were dismissed in accordance with the Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act. This information would be considered “Negative Information” about a consumer and can be reported for seven years from the disposition date.

How do I dispute something on my credit report?

Please visit our Applicant Dispute page for more information.

What are the steps I should take if I’m a victim of identity theft?

If you are a victim of identity theft, take the following four steps as soon as possible, and keep a record with the details of your conversations and copies of all correspondence.

  1. Place a fraud alert on your credit reports, and review your credit reports.Fraud alerts can help prevent an identity thief from opening any more accounts in your name. Contact the toll-free fraud number of any of the three consumer reporting companies below to place a fraud alert on your credit report. You only need to contact one of the three companies to place an alert. The company you call is required to contact the other two, which will place an alert on their versions of your report, too. If you do not receive a confirmation from a company, you should contact that company directly to place a fraud alert.» Equifax: 1-800-685-1111; www.equifax.com; P.O. Box 740241, Atlanta, GA 30374-0241» Experian: 1-888-EXPERIAN (397-3742); www.experian.com; P.O. Box 9532, Allen, TX 75013» TransUnion: 1-800-888-4213; www.transunion.com; Fraud Victim Assistance Division, P.O. Box 6790, Fullerton, CA 92834-6790 Once you place the fraud alert in your file, you’re entitled to order one free copy of your credit report from each of the three consumer reporting companies, and, if you ask, only the last four digits of your Social Security number will appear on your credit reports. Once you get your credit reports, review them carefully. Look for inquiries from companies you haven’t contacted, accounts you didn’t open, and debts on your accounts that you can’t explain. Check that information, like your Social Security number, address(es), name or initials, and employers are correct. If you find fraudulent or inaccurate information, get it removed. See Correcting Fraudulent Information in Credit Reports to learn how. When you correct your credit report, use an Identity Theft Report with a cover letter explaining your request, to get the fastest and most complete results.Continue to check your credit reports periodically, especially for the first year after you discover the identity theft, to make sure no new fraudulent activity has occurred.
  2. Close the accounts that you know, or believe, have been tampered with or opened fraudulently.

    Call and speak with someone in the security or fraud department of each company. Follow up in writing, and include copies (NOT originals) of supporting documents. It’s important to notify credit card companies and banks in writing. Send your letters by certified mail, return receipt requested, so you can document what the company received and when. Keep a file of your correspondence and enclosures.

    When you open new accounts, use new Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) and passwords. Avoid using easily available information like your mother’s maiden name, your birth date, the last four digits of your Social Security number or your phone number, or a series of consecutive numbers.

    If the identity thief has made charges or debits on your accounts, or has fraudulently opened accounts, ask the company for the forms to dispute those transactions:

    » For charges and debits on existing accounts, ask the representative to send you the company’s fraud dispute forms. If the company doesn’t have special forms, use the sample letter to dispute the fraudulent charges or debits. In either case, write to the company at the address given for “billing inquiries,” NOT the address for sending your payments.

    » For new unauthorized accounts, you can either file a dispute directly with the company or file a report with the police and provide a copy, called an “Identity Theft Report,” to the company.

    » If you want to file a dispute directly with the company, and do not want to file a report with the police, ask if the company accepts the FTC Identity Theft Affidavit. If it does not, ask the representative to send you the company’s fraud dispute forms.

    » However, filing a report with the police and then providing the company with an Identity Theft Report will give you greater protection. For example, if the company has already reported these unauthorized accounts or debts on your credit report, an Identity Theft Report will require them to stop reporting that fraudulent information. Use the cover letter to explain to the company the rights you have by using the Identity Theft Report.

    Once you have resolved your identity theft dispute with the company, ask for a letter stating that the company has closed the disputed accounts and has discharged the fraudulent debts. This letter is your best proof if errors relating to this account reappear on your credit report or you are contacted again about the fraudulent debt.

  3. File a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.You can file a complaint with the CFPB using the online complaint form; or Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 1700 G Street N.W., Washington DC 20552.By sharing your identity theft complaint with the CFPB, you will provide important information that can help law enforcement officials across the nation track down identity thieves and stop them. The CFPB can refer victims’ complaints to other government agencies and companies for further action, as well as investigate companies for violations of laws the agency enforces.Additionally, you can provide a printed copy of your online Complaint form to the police to incorporate into their police report. The printed CFPB ID Theft Complaint, in conjunction with the police report, can constitute an Identity Theft Report and entitle you to certain protections. This Identity Theft Report can be used to (1) permanently block fraudulent information from appearing on your credit report; (2) ensure that debts do not reappear on your credit report; (3) prevent a company from continuing to collect debts that result from identity theft; and (4) place an extended fraud alert on your credit report.
  4. File a report with your local police or the police in the community where the identity theft took place. Call your local police department and tell them that you want to file a report about your identity theft. Ask them if you can file the report in person. If you cannot, ask if you can file a report over the Internet or telephone. See below for information about Automated Reports.If the police are reluctant to take your report, ask to file a “Miscellaneous Incident” report, or try another jurisdiction, like your state police. You also can check with your state Attorney General’s office to find out if state law requires the police to take reports for identity theft. Check the Blue Pages of your telephone directory for the phone number or check www.naag.org for a list of state Attorneys General.When you go to your local police department to file your report, bring a printed copy of your FTC Identity Theft Affidavit, your cover letter, and your supporting documentation. The cover letter explains why a police report and an ID Theft Complaint are so important to victims.Ask the officer to attach or incorporate the ID Theft Complaint into their police report. Tell them that you need a copy of the Identity Theft Report (the police report with your ID Theft Complaint attached or incorporated) to dispute the fraudulent accounts and debts created by the identity thief. (In some jurisdictions the officer will not be able to give you a copy of the official police report, but should be able to sign your Complaint and write the police report number in the “Law Enforcement Report” section.)

What does a fraud alert not do?

While a fraud alert can help keep an identity thief from opening new accounts in your name, it’s not a solution to all types of identity theft. It will not protect you from an identity thief using your existing credit cards or other accounts. It also will not protect you from an identity thief opening new accounts in your name that do not require a credit check – such as a telephone, wireless, or bank account. And, if there’s identity theft already going on when you place the fraud alert, the fraud alert alone won’t stop it. A fraud alert, however, can be extremely useful in stopping identity theft that involves opening a new line of credit.

What is a credit freeze?

Many states have laws that let consumers “freeze” their credit – in other words, letting a consumer restrict access to his or her credit report. If you place a credit freeze, potential creditors and other third parties will not be able to get access to your credit report unless you temporarily lift the freeze. This means that it’s unlikely that an identity thief would be able to open a new account in your name. Placing a credit freeze does not affect your credit score – nor does it keep you from getting your free annual credit report, or from buying your credit report or score.

Credit freeze laws vary from state to state. In some states, anyone can freeze their credit file, while in other states, only identity theft victims can. The cost of placing, temporarily lifting, and removing a credit freeze also varies. Many states make credit freezes free for identity theft victims, while other consumers pay a fee – typically $10. It’s also important to know that these costs are for each of the credit reporting agencies. If you want to freeze your credit, it would mean placing the freeze with each of three credit reporting agencies, and paying the fee to each one.

You can find more information about credit freeze laws specific to your state by clicking here, including information on how to place one.

Who can access my credit report if I place a credit freeze?

If you place a credit freeze, you will continue to have access to your free annual credit report. You’ll also be able to buy your credit report and credit score even after placing a credit freeze. Companies that you do business with will still have access to your credit report – for example, your mortgage, credit card, or cell phone company – as would collection agencies that are working for one of those companies. Companies will also still be able to offer you prescreened credit. Those are the credit offers you receive in the mail that you have not applied for. Additionally, in some states, potential employers, insurance companies, landlords, and other non-creditors can still get access to your credit report with a credit freeze in place.

Can I temporarily lift my credit freeze if I need to let someone check my credit report?

If you want to apply for a loan or credit card, or otherwise need to give someone access to your credit report and that person is not covered by an exception to the credit freeze law, you would need to temporarily lift the credit freeze. You would do that by using a PIN that each credit reporting agency would send once you placed the credit freeze. In most states, you’d have to pay a fee to lift the credit freeze. Most states currently give the credit reporting agencies three days to lift the credit freeze. This might keep you from getting “instant” credit, which may be something to weigh when considering a credit freeze.

What are the limits of a credit freeze?

While a credit freeze can help keep an identity thief from opening most new accounts in your name, it’s not a solution to all types of identity theft. It will not protect you, for example, from an identity thief who uses your existing credit cards or other accounts. There are also new accounts, such as telephone, wireless, and bank accounts, which an ID thief could open without a credit check. In addition, some creditors might open an account without first getting your credit report. And, if there’s identity theft already going on when you place the credit freeze, the freeze itself won’t be able to stop it. While a credit freeze may not protect you in these kinds of cases, it can protect you from the vast majority of identity theft that involves opening a new line of credit.

What’s the difference between a credit freeze and a fraud alert?

A fraud alert is another tool for people who’ve had their ID stolen – or who suspect it may have been stolen. With a fraud alert in place, businesses may still check your credit report. Depending on whether you place an initial 90-day fraud alert or an extended fraud alert, potential creditors must either contact you or use what the law refers to as “reasonable policies and procedures” to verify your identity before issuing credit in your name. However, the steps potential creditors take to verify your identity may not always alert them that the applicant is not you.

A credit freeze, on the other hand, will prevent potential creditors and other third parties from accessing your credit report at all, unless you lift the freeze or already have a relationship with the company. Some consumers use credit freezes because they feel they give more protection. As with credit freezes, fraud alerts are mainly effective against new credit accounts being opened in your name, but will likely not stop thieves from using your existing accounts, or opening new accounts such as new telephone or wireless accounts, where credit is often not checked. Also, only people who’ve had their ID stolen – or who suspect it may have been stolen, may place fraud alerts. In some states, anyone can place a credit freeze.

What is an Identity Theft Report?

An Identity Theft Report is a police report with more than the usual amount of detail. The Identity Theft Report includes enough detail about the crime for the credit reporting companies and the businesses involved to verify that you are a victim—and to know which accounts and inaccurate information came from identity theft. Normal police reports often don’t have many details about the accounts that were opened or misused by identity thieves.

The printed copy of your ID Theft Complaint Form can provide additional details for the police report. The police are not legally required to use the FTC Identity Theft Affidavit as part of their report. Your police department may have another way to incorporate the details of your crime. In these cases, the police report by itself may serve as an Identity Theft Report.

When you file your Identity Theft Report, the credit reporting companies will permanently block fraudulent information from appearing on your credit report. Filing an Identity Theft Report with the credit reporting companies or with the companies where the thief used your information should ensure that these debts do not reappear on your credit report. An Identity Theft Report can prevent a company from continuing to try to collect debts that result from identity theft, or sell those debts to others for collection. It also allows you to place an extended fraud alert on your credit report. The credit reporting companies may decline your Identity Theft Report if it does not contain enough detail for them to verify that you are a victim of identity theft. In that case, the credit reporting companies have certain timeframes for responding to your Identity Theft Report with requests for additional information.

Creating and using an Identity Theft Report may require two steps:

Step One begins with filing your report with a local, state, or federal law enforcement agency. These agencies may include your local police department, your State Attorney General, the FBI, the U.S. Secret Service, the FTC, or the U.S. Postal Inspection Service. Some state laws require local police departments to take reports, but there is no law requiring federal agencies to take a report.
In your report, you should give as much information as you can about the crime, including anything you know about the dates of the identity theft, the fraudulent accounts opened and the alleged identity thief. It may help you give the necessary level of detail if you file an online complaint with the FTC, and then ask your local police department to incorporate a copy of the printed ID Theft Complaint into its police report.

Step Two begins when you send the businesses involved and the credit reporting companies a copy of your Identity Theft Report, which you should do by certified mail, return receipt requested. The companies may ask you to give them more information or documentation to help them verify your identity theft. They have to make their request within 15 days of receiving your Identity Theft Report. The credit reporting company or business then has 15 more days to work with you to make sure your Identity Theft Report contains everything they need. They are also entitled to five days to review any information you give them. For example, if you give them information 11 days after they request it, they have until day 16 to make a final decision.

How do I get an Identity Theft Report?

The officer taking your police report can attach or incorporate your ID Theft Complaint into their police report to add more detail. Ask the officer to give you a copy of the official police report that incorporates or attaches your ID Theft Complaint. In some places the officer will not be able to give you a copy of the official police report, but should be able to sign a copy of your ID Theft Complaint and write the police report number in the “Law Enforcement Report” section. Be sure to keep a copy of the police report number.

The police are not legally required to use the FTC’s ID Theft Complaint Form as part of their report. Your police department may have another way to include all the details of your identity theft information in their police report. In these cases, the police report by itself may serve as an Identity Theft Report.

Because the detailed Identity Theft Report is required for you to get many important protections, you may wish to use the Law Enforcement Cover Letter to explain to the police department how important it is for you to get a police report – as well as the legal protections that a detailed Identity Theft Report gives you.

How do I submit my Identity Theft Report to the credit reporting companies or to businesses where the thief used my information?

When you send a copy of your Identity Theft Report to the fraud departments of the three major credit reporting companies, include a copy of the credit reporting company cover letter, along with copies of your supporting documentation. Send your information by certified mail with return receipt requested. The mailing addresses for sending Identity Theft Reports to the three major credit reporting companies are on the cover letter.

When writing to the fraud departments of each of the companies where the identity thief has committed fraud using your personal information, include copies of the Identity Theft Report, your supporting documentation, and the appropriate cover letter: for fraud on your existing accounts, or for fraud on new accounts. Always send this information by certified mail, with a return receipt requested.

The credit reporting companies have certain timeframes for responding to your Identity Theft Report with requests for additional information.

What do I do if the police only take reports about identity theft over the Internet or telephone?

The FTC ID Theft Complaint has a special section for police reports that are not filed face-to-face, to help you use it to supplement an automated police report. If you file a police report online or over the phone, complete the “Automated Report Information” block of the ID Theft Complaint. Attach a copy of any filing confirmation received from the police.

If you have a choice, however, you should file your police report in person and not use an automated report. It is more difficult for the consumer reporting company and information provider to verify the information in an automated report, and they will likely require additional information and/or documentation.

What do I do if the local police won’t take a report?

There are efforts at the federal, state and local level to ensure that local law enforcement agencies understand identity theft, its impact on victims, and the importance of taking a police report. However, we still hear that some departments are not taking reports. The following tips may help you to get a report if you’re having difficulties:

» Provide the officer with a copy of the FTC’s Memo to Law Enforcement that explains why the police report and the Identity Theft Report are so important to both victims and industry.

» Furnish as much documentation as you can to prove your case. Debt collection letters, credit reports, a copy of your printed ID Theft Complaint, and other evidence of fraudulent activity can help demonstrate the legitimacy of your case. Provide the police a copy of “Remedying the Effects of Identity Theft,” which shows that police reports are necessary to secure your rights.

» Be persistent if local authorities tell you that they can’t take a report. Stress the importance of a police report; many creditors require one to resolve your dispute. Remind them that consumer reporting companies will automatically block the fraudulent accounts and bad debts from appearing on your credit report, but only if you can give them a copy of the police report. In addition, a police report may be needed to obtain the fraudulent application and other records the company has.

» If you’re told that identity theft is not a crime under your state law, ask to file a Miscellaneous Incident Report instead.

» If you can’t get the local police to take a report, try your county police. If that doesn’t work, try your state police.

Some states require the police to take reports for identity theft. Check with the office of your State Attorney General, which can be found at www.naag.org, to find out if your state has this law.

How do I prove that I’m an identity theft victim?

Applications or other transaction records related to the theft of your identity may help you prove that you are a victim. For example, you may be able to show that the signature on an application is not yours. These documents also may contain information about the identity thief that is valuable to law enforcement. By law, companies must give you a copy of the application or other business transaction records relating to your identity theft if you submit your request in writing, accompanied by a police report.

Should I apply for a new Social Security number?

Under certain circumstances, the Social Security Administration may issue you a new Social Security number – at your request – if, after trying to resolve the problems brought on by identity theft, you continue to experience problems. Consider this option carefully. A new Social Security number may not resolve your identity theft problems, and may actually create new problems. For example, a new Social Security number does not necessarily ensure a new credit record because credit bureaus may combine the credit records from your old Social Security number with those from your new Social Security number. Even when the old credit information is not associated with your new Social Security number, the absence of any credit history under your new Social Security number may make it more difficult for you to get credit. And finally, there’s no guarantee that a new Social Security number wouldn’t also be misused by an identity thief.